Iron Overload is Associated with Perihematoma Edema Growth following Intracerebral Hemorrhage that May Contribute to in-Hospital Mortality and Long-Term Functional Outcome

ISSN: 1875-5739 (Online)
ISSN: 1567-2026 (Print)


Volume 11, 4 Issues, 2014


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Current Neurovascular Research

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Iron Overload is Associated with Perihematoma Edema Growth following Intracerebral Hemorrhage that May Contribute to in-Hospital Mortality and Long-Term Functional Outcome

Author(s): Babak Bakhshayesh, Mozaffar Hosseininezhad, Seyedeh Nazanin Seyed Saadat, Malek Moien Ansar, Hamed Rameza and Seyed Mohammad Seyed Saadat

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Guilan University of Medical Sciences Poursina Hospital, Rasht, Iran, Postal Code: 41686-48676

Abstract

Iron overload may contribute to brain damage that involves delayed brain atrophy, edema, and neuronal cell death as well as unfavorable outcome following ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).This prospective study wasperformed to determine the association of serum ferritin level, an iron storage protein, with perihematoma edema (PHE) growth as well as in-hospital mortality and long-term clinical outcome of patients with ICH.Data was collected prospectively from patients with ICH between February 2011 and April 2012. Demographicand clinical datawere recorded and serum ferritin was measured on admission. Brain CT scan was performed on admission and 72 hours later. Volume of hematoma and PHE was calculated using ABC/2 formula. Functional outcome was assessed using modified Rankin Scale.A total of 63 patients were included in this study, of these 11 (17.5%) patients died during the first 72 hours of admission.There was a significant correlation between PHE growth during first 72 hours of hospitalization andserum ferritin (P<0.001) as well as history ofdiabetes mellitus (P<0.001). PHE growth during the first 72-hours of hospitalization and baseline hematoma volume were both predictors ofin-hospital mortality and poor outcome, respectively (P= 0.026 and P=0.035 respectively).These results indicate the role of iron overload in the development of PHE following ICH. However,it seems that serum ferritin level isnot directly associated within-hospital mortality and long-term functional outcome

Keywords: Edema, ferritin, growth, hematoma, intracerebral hemorrhage, mortality, outcome

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Article Details

Volume: 11
First Page: 1
Last Page: 6
Page Count: 6
DOI: 10.2174/1567202611666140530124855
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