Platelet Tau Protein as a Potential Peripheral Biomarker in Alzheimer’s disease: An Explorative Study

ISSN: 1875-5828 (Online)
ISSN: 1567-2050 (Print)


Volume 11, 10 Issues, 2014


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Current Alzheimer Research

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Department of Psychiatry Indiana University School of Medicine
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Platelet Tau Protein as a Potential Peripheral Biomarker in Alzheimer’s disease: An Explorative Study

Author(s): Mukaetova-Ladinska EB, Abdell-All Z, Andrade J, da Silva JA, Boksha I, Burbaeva G, Kalaria RJ and O' Brien JT

Affiliation: Institute for Ageing and Health, Campus for Ageing and Vitality Newcastle University Newcastle NE4 5PL UK.

Abstract

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measures of tau and amyloid proteins have now been largely accepted to be a diagnostic tool to aid the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but CSF is not routinely obtained in most clinical settings. There is a need, therefore, to uncover additional readily accessible peripheral biomarkers that will enable comprehensive detection of AD-specific proteins in blood and blood derivates. Blood platelets contain proteins found in neuronal cell lines, including tau protein. Since tau protein is a characteristic of AD-neuropathology, we conducted a detailed clinico-biochemical analysis of tau measures of the microtubule-binding and C-terminal region, as well as two tau phosphorylation sites (Ser202/Thr205 and Thr181) in 25 AD and 26 control subjects. We report that platelet tau protein measures did not discriminate between AD and control individuals. However, subjects with MMSE 24-27 had elevated C-terminal end tau protein (p=0.049) compared to those with MMSE >27, whereas older AD subjects (>80 years) showed higher t-tau protein in comparison to younger AD (<80 years; p=0.009) and control (<80 years; p=0.011) participants. These initial findings not only confirm that platelet tau protein can be measured, but also indicate that platelet tau measures merit further study as they may be useful in indicating early stages of cognitive impairment. Further studies on larger number of participants are needed to confirm our findings.

Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, blood, older adults, platelets, tau protein

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Article Details

Volume: 10
First Page: 1
Last Page: 8
Page Count: 8
DOI: 10.2174/15672050113109990149
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